Teufelsberg (Abandoned spy station)

A Cold War relic lies abandoned on top of a mountain made of rubble, built over a Nazi college that couldn't be destroyed after the end of World War II. The gates of the former US spy station are locked and secure; its perimeter sealed by an uncompromising high fence, an angry crisscross mesh of wires that clearly imply: “Eintritt Verboten!”

Welcome to Teufelsberg, literally “Devil's Mountain,” a hill reaching 114.7 meters above sea-level, made from an estimated 12 million cubic meters of war rubble (apparently about 400,000 bombed houses) pushed together in the north of the Grunewald forest in West Berlin.

Buried deep beneath is what's left of a planned Nazi-military training school designed by chief Nazi architect Albert Speer. So sturdy was it that attempts by the Allies to destroy it failed, so they covered it with rubble instead. There was plenty of it around at the time. Every day, 80 truckloads of 7,000 cubic meters of rubble collected mostly by local women used to arrive. They became known as Trümmerfrauen or “rubble women” for their efforts.

Perched atop this (wo)man-made mound now sits the old abandoned listening or intelligence-gathering station used during the Cold War by the Americans and British to learn what was going on in Russian-controlled East Germany. It wasn't very discreet; three huge bulbous globes, two “radomes” perched atop buildings three-stories high and another sitting a further six-stories higher, creating a giant condom-shaped tower.

I mean, the Ruskis must have known this stuff was here, especially as it was built on Berlin's highest “mountain.” Maybe the Amis wanted to taunt their foes with their phallic handiwork. Evidently it was a source of great pride.

Due to its unique fucked-up history – a starring role in two World Wars and its subsequent division between the world's superpowers – Berlin found itself at the center of the so-called Cold War. This had nothing to do with nuclear snowballs, but was a pseudo war that flattered to deceive and ultimately never came to fruition despite the considerable expense accrued by its protagonists. Another considerable waste of money and illustration of human folly.

Spying and surveillance were the order of the day in divided Berlin. American mobile listening units, eavesdropping on Soviet and East German communications in the late 1950s, discovered they got better reception and coverage from the top of the 115 meter-high Teufelsberg. Quelle surprise!

The first mobile units took up position atop the hill in July 1961, with more permanent facilities following in 1963 before Field Station Berlin Teufelsberg gradually grew over the following years to become one of the West's largest spying stations ever.

As the mountain was in fact located in the British sector of Berlin, the Brits and Americans cooperated on their spying programs. (Presumably this means the Brits did whatever the U.S. National Security Agency told them to.)

USM 620 Kilo, as it was also known, was part of the worldwide Echelon spy network. Each radome globe contained massive 12-metre satellite dishes and the most sophisticated spying equipment for the time, enabling the western powers to intercept satellite signals, radio waves, microwave links and other transmissions, before interpreting and analyzing their findings. It’s clear that they didn't really trust the Ruskis that much. The feeling was mutual.

Contrary to common belief, however, there was no radar equipment ever installed at the facility.* There was no need for it. Radar is used to detect objects (such as airplanes, missiles, terrain) and the Allies already had radar facilities at Tegel, Templehof and Gatow airports. Teufelsberg’s function was to listen – nothing more.

Field Station Teufelsberg lost its raison d'être after the fall of the Berlin Wall and end of the Cold War, and was eventually abandoned in 1992 to the Wildschwein that allegedly call Grunewald home. The Americans used to call them “Grunie Pigs.” I didn't meet any of course, proving again beyond a shadow of a doubt that they don't exist.

In 1996, the 4.7-hectare site was sold to developers for 5.2 million Deutschmark, and they started with their plans to build “exclusive” apartments (must have taken their cue from Irish developers), a hotel and restaurant, as well as a spy-museum. Spiraling costs put paid to all that however, and the project was abandoned mid-construction after reaching debts of €50 million.

In February 2008, filmmaker David Lynch tried buy the place along with some crazy foundation of meditationists and yoga-bashers who wanted to build a “Happiness College” featuring a 12-storey 50-meter high “Tower of Invincibility” to house 1,000 students. The city turned down the proposals for some reason.

Another group of hopeless romantics, nostalgic for the good old Cold War days, want to preserve the remains of Field Station Teufelsberg as a memorial. They bemoan the damage caused to their beloved spy station by vandals and other unwanted visitors. The “Save Teufelsberg” campaign is now in full swing.

No new buildings can be erected on the site after it was declared part of the surrounding forested area in 2004, though the developers still retain hope of constructing apartments in the existing buildings. Negotiations are ongoing.

There was a time curiosity appeasers could enter through the broken fence and go in for a wander, but opportunists have taken advantage of the ongoing uncertainty by leasing the land and charging visitors admission. So ist Berlin. The group claims to be protecting the vandalized buildings from vandals. Sometimes they offer tours too. The fence has been repaired and thuggish security guards demand money from those who jump over it.

The situation is likely to continue until the developers and city agree on Teufelsberg’s ultimate fate. Of course, it would be great to see it restored/preserved, but that all costs money the city doesn’t have and developers don’t give away without something in return.

Meanwhile, I’ve had to update the visiting guide below to reflect the current situation. You can either take your chances with security or simply cough up the money they demand. Fittingly perhaps, it’s a devil’s choice.

What
Field Station Berlin Teufelsberg (Abandoned listening/spy station and Cold War relic.)

Where
Teufelsbergchaussee, 14193, Berlin.

How to get there
Get the S-Bahn, S9 or S75 to Heerstraße, or S1 to Grunewald and walk/cycle from there. Map can be accessed here.

Getting in
From the carpark simply walk the paved “Dragonfly street” path until you come to the fence. It’s much better fortified since someone noticed there was money to be made. If you follow it around you’ll come to the main gate. It’s the easiest entrance point but from there you’ll likely have to contend with security.

When to go
Daytime is better for observation purposes. Teufelsberg also provides good vistas of the city of Berlin. Nighttime could be good for parties, though care should be taken not to fall drunkenly from the unsecured tower. Fall soberly if you have to.

Difficulty rating
8/10 if you plan on avoiding security, 1/10 if you accede to paying them.
 
Who to bring
Friends for a party and exploration. Girlfriend/boyfriend for a romantic vista over Berlin.

What to bring
Camera. Beer. A torch. Maybe a few sandwiches. All that exploring can be hungry work!

Dangers
Not all ladders in the towers are secured to the concrete. Be careful! Luckily I was able to climb back down the one I ascended, or I'd still be there now.
Wind. It can get very breezy on Berlin's highest point. Most of the surviving buildings don't have walls so be careful you don't get blown off.

Again, spread the word, and suggestions for other abandoned and dangerous sites to be explored would be most welcome!

*I had this confirmed by Reinhard von Bronewski, whose excellent Berlin-Brigade site is a treasure trove for anyone interested in U.S. operations and sites during the Cold War in Berlin. Mr. von Bronewski said he'd spoken with many former Teufelsberg military police and troops, including high-ranking officers, and they all said the same thing: “This was no radar hill.”

This post has been updated from the one that first appeared on June 26, 2009, to take the latest developments into account, add some historical details, more photos, and make some other general improvements. All photos were taken on June 23, 2009.


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121 comments

ACHTUNG - NOT SAFE!

Would not recommend going there in the nearest future.

I went to the Teufelsberg spy station with my boyfriend on Sunday the 31st of October to explore and take pictures of the site and the amazing view of Berlin. Not only was the surrounding forest packed with berliners out for their sunday walks, but there was also a film crew shooting a scene by the main gate. We decided not to get discouraged, having gotten thus far we simply couldn't let the opportunity pass as our stay in Berlin was short. We searched the surrounding fence for holes, only to find that all of them were sealed shut. Eventually we found a corner where a tree leaned against the fence and the barbed wire on top was cut, so we managed to climb over. We then rushed up to the tower building, and saw guards standing outside one of the entrances. Still set on getting the full experience of the radomes, we cautiously made our way to the top, as quietly and discretely as possible. Once in the building, we met four other explorers, which was very nice, but necessarily also made us more noisy and visible from the ground area. We got to enjoy the view and have our lunch on the rooftop, but just as we were getting ready to make our way back down, an angry german dressed in black came up on the rooftop, shouting and waving his arms. He didn't speak a word of English, but from our little knowledge of German we understood that it was strictly forbidden (more so than we thought), and that we were going to face punishment. The guard escorted us down to the first floor, where we met his supervisor, who spoke English. He insisted on seeing our identification, which he then kept in his possession while interrogating us as he led us down to the main gate. Apparently we were being led to the head guard of the facility. The boss gave us two alternatives; we could surrender our pictures and be let off with a warning, or we could keep the pictures, pay a fine of 30 euros, and face the police, which at best would cost us 150 euros in fines. We surrendered our disposable camera (leaving out the fact that we had several cameras in my bag), and they let us go with the warning of further prosecution if they ever saw us there again. Luckily they didn't search us, or we would be far worse off. I guess they let us off pretty easy, seeing as we were merely two doe-eyed Norwegian tourists who came to "make picture" with our disposable camera, and didn't understand the "EINTRITT VERBOTEN"-signs all along the fence. Hopefully our German co-explorers were as fortunate as us.

Thanks for writing and sharing your story Hanna. It certainly doesn't sound good. I'm not sure who those security guys are, or even if they should be there, but what you describe sounds very suspect. Whatever about the police demanding ID and what not, nobody else has the right to ANY of your belongings, pictures, cameras or anything else. Nor can they fine you €30 or issue a fine for ANYTHING at all. If they are genuine security people (which I doubt) they can escort you off the premises and call the police, but they have no right to do anything else. They could call the police but I have a feeling they're not supposed to be there either...

Yep, went here on monday through a hole and got busted 2 minutes later, threatened with police action by the security guards (+ Alsatian!) . unable to speak to them in english....Walked off with no issues after some Australian explorers, also busted, shouted at them in german.
really gutted not to make it up there but it was a cool trip out to the hill. Well done hanna for getting that far! It seems the security are pretty heavy up there at the moment... Might not have even tried though if we had read your story before!

Thanks for the comment Kim. It seems the guards are a permanent presence in Teufelsberg now. I haven't had time to get up there to investigate it further, but aim to do so within the next month. It's just too good to be off-limits all of a sudden. I promise an investigative report to follow!

i have been there many times over the years and never had trouble. about a month ago the fences were resealed so we had to do some careful climbing, more recently (2011)a new big hole has been cut (near the old original hole) and there were many people exploring the site once again. it is possible some of the squatters were posing as security? but they seemed to no longer be on site. as far as i have known any official security on-site have always been friendly and kept one opening for people to respectfully come and go. it's definately worth having a look for yourself.

As of now (May 22nd, 2011) the place is open for both official and unofficial visits. It seems to have become somehow commercialized, but with proper urban exploration skills it is a proper place for a visit (besides, you can do it in a rather easy manner).

There are multiple options to trespass the fence, just stay away from the main gate. There are some works in progress, but nothing much was happening on Sunday's afternoon.

Highly appreciated, made my day!

going to take a look at some stage next week so hopefully wont be any rogue "security" etc

~simon

I visited just a few days ago and there were at least two easily found holes in the fence. The path seemed well worn and there were only other like minded adventurers present – no security at all. Something is definitely out of the ordinary with the occupancy and use of the place although I can't out my finger on what it is. The stairs were freshly swept and someone had taken to attempting to repair hand rails and other bits around the place?

Lots of visitors today & No "Security Guards"

Beautiful anyway!
Thanks a lot!

I worked here for 3 years in the 1970s as an RAF Russian linguist, staioned at Gatow. I've been back to Berlin several times since, sometimes with my wife (a former WRAF I met there) but never trekked up to the old place.
I'll be over in November and this time I might give it a looking over.
Great site here people, well done.
Mick, an old cold warrior.

Visited to day. Excelent. Great view! Many openings in the fence, and also by the main gate.

Been there twice, mid september and then again 9th October. Went midday both times; around 2:00 ish. Lots of other tourists the second time, was a bit dodgy walking around on the bottom, some squatters have moved back in and seemed a bit suspect, but once you ascend to the higher tower I didn't see any trouble. There seems to have been an art exhibition there or something...saw a few piles of fresh fliers etc, as of recently though I would advise only checking out the main towers, the other occupants (permanent?) seemed to have colonised the parts near the smallest tower.

Very cool place! Went there for the first time today. Just walked around the perimeter. No need to venture in. Maybe another time: http://allbillnobull.net/2011/10/underwhelming-camera-market-gleis-17.html

Thank you for a wonderful blog! I've been reading it for a couple of months now, but didn't go to any of the places before last friday. My bf and I took the trip to Teufelsberg in extremely thick fog. We didn't get the view over Berlin, but we got a hell of a cool mood while ther. Snook around for almost two hours. At some point we heard a male voice shout "HALT!" some place around the main entrance. No idea if it was the guard, but we stayed low after that, and didn't talk that much for the remainder of our stay.

Planning an outing with a friend this weekend, and another with my bf the week after. Thank you again so much for the detailed info on how to get in etc.

Have you by the way heard of the abandoned insane asylum? A friend of mine mentioned it, and am considering doing that one, but need more info about the place before deciding. Guards I can handled - but if there are dogs, I'm staying clear!

Just went there on this past Friday Dec 12th. We didn't encounter any security but we did come across a several other explorers. Some said that they had heard security was more strict as of the past month or so and that you could get a ticket up to 350 Euros. We decided to proceed anyway. The gate at the driveway has a gap that you can squeeze through and if you go at night as we did I'm sure it is much easier to remain undetected. It was a really interesting site and I would highly recommend a visit but as always be careful. There are many places to take a nasty fall and apparently security might be cracking down.

Yesterday (23 Jan. 2012), I was there with some friends. We saw several security guards with talkie-walkies, they said us “Das ist VERBOTTEN!”. We decided to wait a bit, walk around the fence. We meet a guide, said us that there is now guided tour for 15 euros but it´s just once week (every Sunday at 12h30 at S-Bahn Grunewald). He said us that it´s very difficult to get in and security guards are able to give us fines about 150euros. So we had some hesitations to get in.
But we found a hole in the fence and get in! And it was AMAZING!!! We didn´t see any guards anymore, they left the site around 4h30 / 5 o´clock. Be very careful cause it might be dangerous with the rain and the mud. Don´t pay 15 euros for a guiding tour please! It is art, it is Berlin, it is about culture, don´t pay for that!
I just can advise you to wear something very warm and enjoy it!

We also went to Teufelsberg last Sunday. We tried to get in at around 2pm but there were quite a few security guards and there was also an official guided tour happening on the site for 15 euros per person. We asked some people who were just coming out through a whole in the fence if it is easy to get in: they said there are many guards but they only tell you to get out so no real danger of a fine or even police caution. But we also heard they usually leave when the tour ends around 3-3:30pm. We couldn't wait too long as it was freezing but sunny, and around 2:30pm we got in. Once we got into a building we heard a dog barking and a security guard shouting, we ran to the other side of the building and went up the tower. The guards did not follow us, and indeed later they left, and the site was full of people wandering around, even a mother with two kids! It was definitely worth it, amazing site, though you have to watch your step when walking around. Apparently the security thing is just a facade whilst the "official" tour is happening....

I were there today (30 January) with a couple of friends and, after a shitload of trying to sneek in quiet to avoide the guards, was greeted with childrens laughter. We were perplexed. Was it not guarded by mean german security guards? Hm. We met 10-15 people in different groups, amoung them kids - and NO guards. It was not a guided tour or anything, just a lot of fellow explorers enjoying the site in the great (but freezing) weather. So I guess the security is sporadically to frighten people from going there.

Check out pictures of the day here (the light was amazing up there): http://www.flickr.com/photos/robinrabies/sets/72157629105158859/

Cheers and thanks for an interesting blog.

Thanks for the comments. Seems the guards aren't too worried about protecting the place, rather they're more worried about protecting their incomes. Though how and why they have the right to conduct "official" tours is another question. Seems very suspicious to me.
Cool pics Robin. Yeah the light's fantastic for exploring right now. Unfortunately work is calling too...

the only issue I had there today was other explorers getting in the way of my shots.... love this place

You're right Guillaume - it's getting pretty damn crowded these days. No wonder they want to start charging people...

We have been there today (saturday). No security at all but a bunch of other explorers and young kids partying. The guided tour is every sunday. Maybe it's better to go there on other days. The view is amazing and definitely worth a visit.

I was in Teufelsberg on March 27.

Couldn't wait to see that place, and when I got there, the place was just amazing.

One longboarder I met on the road was helpful and explained, that security is in site only on Sundays, when there are excursions on station.

He showed me the hole (apparently there are various holes around the fence).

So I got in, walked around, took pictures. There were around 30 people around the station, all friendly and various aged.

After about an hour I noticed security at the gates so I quickly went and told some other people and we went out of the station trough a different hole, near ski slope.

I heard some dog barks, so security also had dogs.

That's all.

If was by Teufelsberg May 10th - lots of ways in - holes everywhere. Really nice place, but not so secret anymore. We meet at least 10 other explorers - and was "caught" after 2 hours by a guard. He was somewhat cranky in the beginning, talking about calling the police and deleting our pics, but warmed up, and told us that we could have visited legally on sundays. Ended up paying a fine which was the same price of the guided tour. 2 guards - and no dogs.

I was there today- no security, but I did met a few other people. Tons of broken glass from assholes trashing the place, so good boots are recommended. The acoustics in the main radome are FANTASTIC.

Went up on Friday (18/05/2012). Found a way in very, very easily, and started snapping away. After about half an hour two security guards caught us and some others, and escorted us out, whilst the whole time we could hear youngsters in the radomes above throwing bottles off the top! I decided to give it until after six to see if the guards would leave, and then tried again solo. I managed to make it the roof after playing cat and mouse with the guards, but there was a man putting some railings around the edge of the roof who phoned security, and before I could even get my tripod set up I was joined by security. He didn't threaten me with a fine after I made it clear I didn't understand his German unlike some people have said, and was actually nice enough to let me get the shot that I wanted overlooking the city to the East! I made my way down (getting a few more shots, obviously) before exiting the site through some very obvious holes at the back of the site. Definitely worth the mosquito bites we got! Would love to go again for sunset.

Hi, I used to work here. And I can confirm that there are wild boar in the forest - I came across a family of them on my mountain bike. I bought that bike back in 1991 in a shop in Berlin and I still have it. It was the best way to get around the city because the Germans are a clever lot and they provide cycle lanes everywhere.
Anyway - back to T-Berg, as we used to call it. The work room was a bit boring and had no windows. We worked shifts so we did not see day-light for many hours. There was a pretty good restaurant on site and it did a decent burger and chips at 4am - the Americans shift system was different to ours for some reason and their vending machines were full of American junk. Tasted OK but you knew it was pure crap.
No, I am not going to say what I used to do because that is all behind us now. It is a shame that the site has not been redeveloped into something more interesting.
Oh yeah, there was a nudist colony in the woods somewhere. I cam across that on a bike ride with my girlfriend (now wife). Not that nice.
I do remember finishing a morning shift and running back to our accommodation which was in the Olympic village behind the stadium. Ah, happy days.

Mike, hi. Thanks for your comment. If you're interested in talking a bit more about your work there, please get in touch! Thanks again.

There were also these strange creatures working there that sometimes wore blue shirts and camo pants. We were led to believe they were RAF, but the RAF was too cheep to buy camo tops to go with the pants. Having worked there, I also remember listening to Waldbuhne concerts while on the roof. I also have fond memories of rappeling off the climbing tower outside the fence as well as off a bridge that crossed a gully.

Went there last week with some friends. After sneaking in through a hole in the fence we were caught by a guy wearing a security vest who took us into a nearby building. There was a guy waiting there who told us we had to pay a 5 dollar "entry fee" and sign a waiver that they weren't responsible for what happened to us in any way shape or form (very German). After that we were free to explore, it was quiet busy and I think we say ~20 other explorers. There we're also a couple graffiti artists around the place that were working on new pieces. Some of the buildings were off limits though (luckily not the cool main one with the domes) because there was asbestos and exposed fiber glass in them. This all happened on a Thursday and after sneaking in we saw that the main gate at the entrance was open and you could just enter and exit through that.

Was there on 20th of July 2012 and had exactly the same experience as the above poster of 16th of July. We actually found an empty copy of that waiver in a building and took it with us. Hasn't managed to find any real info when googling the company name: "Teufelsberg Gmbh", but the english wikipedia page for Teufelsberg links to a company that claims to do guided tours there.
I'd say that the best graffiti is in building with the main tover. If you bring

Hi all. By total good fortune followed a couple of kids who climbed a fence to gain entry. As a 64 year old adventurer I found the entire discovery adventure a real blast. Finally found the external stairway and made it to the top for an amazing vista of the city and the surrounds. The graffiti kids have done some cool work and everyone seemed to be chilling out. great experience and I came away with some great photo shots even if they were courtesy of the trusty I Phone.Gold.

Warren, I think you met us as well, while you were there on Monday. We went exploring after about 7pm and had a blast climbing buildings we shouldn't climb and getting on tops of things that weren't easy to get on top of. It was very chill and there were a ton of people there hanging out, exploring, and creating new graffiti. Irish, are any of your sites that you've posted about, no longer accessible? And do you have plans for more explorations?

As far as I'm aware only the Garbáty cigarette factory is now out of bounds. It's now apartments.
Otherwise, everything else is still explorable, albeit with increased security in places, and with people trying to make money from explorers in others.
And yes, I do have plans to write about a couple more explorations I've done lately. Time (or lack of it) is my main problem at present.

I'm definitely looking forward to it! We're going to Berlin for the entire month of September -- here's hoping you find some time until then :)

I also visited Teufelsberg in August 2011. I saw about 6 or 8 people there, no security at all. Really, really nice.

Blog post here (in French, LOTS of pictures): http://europatrick.com/2011/08/27/retrospective-de-vendredi-1ere-partie/

I was there today with some friends. We tried to enter through the main gate. But a guy stood there and acted like a guard, he told us that he wanted 5 euro per person for entrance. It was obvious he had no rights to do that. So we found a hole in the fence (quite tricky to find actually) and entered. At the tower we really saw a LOT of people who wanted to check out the place. Before we were leaving however, we checked out a place that looked like a "village" with a small spy tower and two "bars" made for open air parties probably. Then the security guy suddenly stood there again and asked for a ticket. We started to walk away, but then another guy came out of the small tower, talking to the "security guy", apparently a friend of his. The guy was wearing a kaftan and a turban. We got away, but the security guy was kind of intimidating.

Being at the tower was totally chill, they were even rigging up a lot of stuff for what seemed like a music video. But the security guys - it smelled like scam and corruption.

Hi,
I went there a couple of times, but I recently went there 1 weeks ago.
Me and my friend, really had difficulties to find a place where to go through the fence, as it looks like they closed and the holes that were through the fence. We finally found our way climbing over the fence, but my dress got a bit stucked in the barbed wire, so I ended up with a couple of holes in my dress, but didn't hurt my self. Anyway, if you're a woman, I would recommend you not to were adress or a skirt if you decide to go there. Once, inside, we talked with a guy who was living there in the small tower. He asked us if we paid to get in, and we said no. Then he told us, that we're supposed to go to see the guard, and pay 5€ to get in,so then we could receive a stamp. Apparently, the security guy was his friend. As he was a bit insistent, we pretendind that we would go to meet and pay the security guy a bit later, but of course we didn't. Then, we went to explore the place, but didn't have any other trouble, and we didn't see the guard.
The last time I went there, in july, it was so much easier to get in, and while we were sitting in the building looking at some guys making some graffitis, the guard appeared, he had a look at the guys making graffitis and at us, but didn't say anything at all, and then just left.
Anyway, if you go there, don't take the main entrance, as they are probably gonna charge you 5€,try to avoid the guard, and if some people ask you if you paid, whoever they are just say yes, as it will avoid you having trouble
.

I have been there a couple of times this summer, but the last time that I went was much different than before. It was Saturday, Sept 1. The fence had undergone some major repairs, and we had trouble finding a hole. Eventually we found one that looked brand new, and climbed through and started walking around. Despite the newly restored fence, we weren't too worried about guards as there were a handful of people kind of lying around, and I just assumed they were hanging out. We were caught almost immediately by a weary seeming guard who just looked like a normal guy and escorted out the front gate.

He asked us to tell him where the hole that we found was, but we just kind of mumbled about climbing the fence so he dropped it.

We went right back through the same hole and approached the main towers from the opposite side, but we were a bit put off because we could hear people doing work to the building with electric saws, etc. Again we saw some people lying around the main building, and when they saw us they kind of started looking at us so we ducked behind some bushes. Finally we decided to approach them, figuring they probably were involved in the tours (run by artists, very low key) and would let us stay if we acknowledged that no insurance would cover us if we got hurt (As in the past). As we started to walk towards them though, a car drove up and screeched on the breaks as soon they saw us so we ran.

On our way out we saw the same guy who had kicked us out -- he was closing up our hole. He just kind of shook his head and said "Really? Again" and we apologized and climbed through.

Does anyone know what's going on up there? Other than a few Australian teenagers we met in the woods just inside the fence, there seemed to be no one unofficial up there, which is a big difference from last time. Are they restoring it maybe or doing some kind of repairs? The "guards" had multiplied and seemed to actually care if people were there or not, and that car screeching to a halt seemed pretty serious...

Also, if anyone is seriously interested in this stuff and has an extra ten euro or so, it's worth it to take the tour if they are in fact cracking down for real. I did the tour with my language school when I first came to Berlin, and the people running it are super chill and relaxed, but also knowledgeable.

friend and i visited the place yesterday (just to note, we were there around 2pm on a weekday) - it was my first time there, but he had visited it a couple of years ago and knew the way. circled the perimeter looking for a way in, but found all the gaps and holes to be sealed up (and sealed up well - in some cases with barbed wire). after a long walk around, we stumbled upon another bunch of tourists who found a hole that had been sealed up, but had been made loose so that one could (with a bit of difficulty) climb their way through.

walked up towards the tower and ran in to a couple of people on the way - next to the building we saw a couple of people working on the place, doing various restorations or artworks. There were also a couple of cars and a van, which surprised us as we were not aware that the place was being actively used by anyone. we assumed that perhaps a tv crew or so were filming there that day and therefore using the area.

we walked the stairs up to the main tower, where we ran in to a couple of guys with a camera, who essentially ignored our presence, which we took to be a good sign. walking up, we heard more voices and stumbled upon maybe 10 or so people upon reaching the floor. a couple of them were a bit older (60+) so we thought that we had perhaps stumbled upon a tour group of some sort, knowing that tours were being held at the place, but not when or where.

we were greeted by a man who immediately demanded to know who we were. he was dressed normally, with a bit of unwashed smell about him. we played the unassuming tourist card and when he asked how we got in, we admitted we came through a hole. he seems quite surprised about this, asking us where it was and said something about getting it sealed up again (we didn't give it away). he told us that he was holding an organised tour there, for which one usually pays 7 euros, but let us join the tour and said he would let us off if we gave a donation at the end of the tour. i asked him a bit about what was going on there, saying that i didn't at all know that there were organised tours at all, etc. he spoke of an artist collective (former squatters?) who have been working on transforming the area in to a tacheles-style centre for art, performance and culture. they've been working on getting the official approval for the usage of the buildings (the group has secured the length of the tower with hand rails and barriers to stop people from falling out of the barriers, for example) and mentioned that they received approval to start running tours at the site (assumedly from the behörde) as of last week or so. so the developments are all quite recent.

(cont..)

(cont..)

in any case, they seem like a legitimate group that are running the site at the moment, if not a bit blue-eyed and (might i say it) hippie-esque. your standard squatter-artist types. at some point there was an artist doing something with the cloth exterior of the tower (complete with abseiling rig) and the guide we were speaking to asked him about what he was doing, and asked the guy if he had received permission from someone to do so, so there seems to be some kind of organisation within the group. plan at the moment seems to be to expand the tours held there (assumedly to pump up revenue), with the end goal to turn the site in to a legally run artist collective. we were up in the dome (with the insane acoustics) and he spoke about the possibility of holding concerts up there, etc and using the space constructively. they've also joint up with a local hacker collective and apparently wireless internet is going to be installed in the coming week or so, so one can access wifi from the site. lots going on, all serious it seems.

at some point the guide was distracted chiding a group of other visitors who had also climbed through the same hole we did, and we took the chance to escape through the front gate and spent about an hour trying to get back out of the grünewald. nice guy, but something about him wasn't quite right. all in all a great day - there are definitely changes going on up there. the guided tours seem to run daily (the guy spoke of not wanting to do any marketing, and just waiting for the visitors to come to them - you can join by going through the front gate). don't know how long the hole-in-the-fence tactic will last unfortunately, they seem to be there around the clock (from the smell of him, he hadn't left for a while) and serious about keeping all the holes closed, with the tours probably being their only source of revenue.

i'm leaving berlin soon, so i won't be back to visit and time soon, but i'd love to hear any updates about the place. glad to have stopped by - i think the glory days might unfortunately be over though.

oh and, this weekend is 'tage der offenen tür' with concerts and events planned, for anyone who is interested. enter through the main gate

fhain_lady - thanks a million for your informative and detailed comment, a post in itself! Sorry to hear you're leaving Berlin soon. Hope it treated you well.
Also, thanks to the anonymous posters and Justine for their contributions. Every one of your comments are of great help to anyone thinking of visiting Teufelsberg.

Hi Guys,

I have been meaning to go to Teufelsberg since I moved here 6 months ago. Unfortunately I only got around to it yesterday. Firstly my boyfriend and I walked the wrong way so got lost in the forest for a few hours which really wasn't as romantic as it sounds. When we finally got to the front gates of the spy station there were quite a few people waiting there as there was a sign on the locked gate which read 'Tour at 4pm' and other signs suggesting the tour would cost 7 euros. We were a bit disappointed with that and discussed with the others there if there were any holes that we could climb through, after circumnavigating the fence we found that any tiny hole that might once have been had been completely covered. At 4.30 a burly looking secruty guy came to the gate, made some kind of exchange with a guy in the car and then told everyone that the tour would start in 45 minutes when he would lead us in and then back out. He left the gate again and everyone in the group decided that there was something really strange about the whole thing and that we did not want to fund it. Considering everyone was there to see it, no one went on the tour. Managed to get a couple of shots of the spy station on the walk around the fence but will not be going back, it looks like the place is run by a bunch of opportunists now, and not even nice ones. Gutted.

I visited the Teufelsberg site on Monday 24th September. Due to the popularity of the place it looks like they're regularly letting visitors in for a 7 Euro fee- the place actually felt a little crowded at times.

It's possible to get through the fence- there are literally dozens of wholes, breaks in the fence which have since been resealed with barbed wire and mesh. Access points are scarce so I'd recommend pliers or wire cutters to reopen a gap. Security seemed pretty lax, they were unable to distinguish myself from the legitimate paying customers- I think that Hanna's horror story (#45) may be an unfortunate exception.

Upon leaving the site I cycled down the path towards HeerStrasse. I paused as I heared the sound of mysterious grunts and squeels, they were coming from the trees beside me. Upon closer inspection- A wild boar- piglet by its side- the thing was charging for me. After reading this article I thought these WildSchwein were something of a myth- but they're real- they're there- they're aggressive- take care!!

JC

Hello,

Yep, a beautiful, eerie site. Went there on the last warm week-end of October. Did not know about the place much, apart from the fact I really wanted to see it. Did not know of this blog at the time either. Walked up the hill and just saw a bunch of people standing in front of the gate - nobody quite knew when when it was starting and for how long it would last, but they were waiting for a tour. A hand-made sign graffitied on a piece of cardboard inside said something like "guided tour every hour". I did not want to wait around, and noticed some traffic along the fence towards the left of the gate, so decided to explore. A few hundred meters in - bam - there was a small hole in the fence with a steady stream of people (it was a week-end) sifting through regularly. Bingo. I was in. I happily explored the surrounding buildings for a while and then found the way to the highest tower - of course, I just had to get up there.

Got to the first level platform (where another dome sits) and this is where I ran into the asshole who presumably runs the tour. I was starting to climb up the stairs towards the highest dome when he interpelled me and asked me if I had a stamp. I said I didn't (pretty much like another hundred people there, but that's not the issue). So he said I have no right to be there and have to get down. I asked why. He said he owned the place, was renting it, and it was private property. I asked to see some proof of that - or maybe like a guide pass - something official. At which point he said he will call the police. I said, please do. And then he started getting very agressive and threatening, screaming at me to "get down" - like an order. I wish I knew kung fu as I was really tempted to smack his ass for pointless agressive abuse. But he was sturdier and larger than me, and I was standing with my back to the staircase, so became afraid he'd push me down the flight of stairs or something. Danger vibes. So I decided to retreat. I went around the wall and stood there until he left. Then I went up to enjoy the magical acoustics, but the experience was by now just a little bit spoilt as I could not get rid of my anger from being threatened like that. By a blatant liar on top of things.

I still wonder why he interpelled just me, and not, for example, the two german dudes with cameras not far behind who also climbed through the hole. Maybe because I was a girl and on my own. Easy prey. What an asshole.

So come with friends :)

I am only for creative takeovers of places by artists and various nutter communities, but now I'm really sad to know the site is being taken over by a bunch of nasty opportunists. Can we do something about it?

Hi Malina,
Thanks for sharing your experience. Happy to hear you still enjoyed your visit despite that asshole. What a prick! But I reckon you took the right approach. Of course you're always within your rights to ask for some form of ID. Even the ticket checkers on the trains carry ID.
Unfortunately there are opportunists everywhere, and Berlin is just like everywhere else in that regard - maybe even worse.
Thanks again,
IB

Hey IB,

Glad to share - and yes, it was absolutely amazing despite meeting the biggest prick on earth there.

Thanks for this blog - I'm up for more adventures now! : )

Malina, your story prompted me to go have a look again for myself. So I went again today. Will post the latest update shortly.
You're very welcome by the way. I'm glad people get a kick out of it. Not literally of course - that's the last thing I'd want. ;)

Former Teufelsberg-Guide, I'm very sorry, I did not wish to remove your comment. I was simply trying to remove the link. Below is a copy of the original comment you left, and I will post my original response below too:

"Since last May, Teufelsberg ist hired out from the Cologne investor to a private tenant. He organize the security at his own expenses to protect Teufelsberg from vandalism, metal thief and firebugs. There are on workdays security guides on the area, they may be a kind of rude, for my opinion the organisation of security and entrance fees is still a bit obscure at the moment.

"As a quid pro quo the tenant can use the area for guided tours or other of a business nature (fims, photographing, workshops...). i think, it's fair and the only way to protect Teufelsberg at the moment. But it is not legal to take entrance fees on workdays without visiting the TBerg while a guided tour.

"Be sure, the entrance fee, that every legal visitor pay on Sat/Sun is not for enrichment of the tenant, it is two-thirds for protection of the heritage Teufelsberg, and for one third for the guy (student, historian or US-contemporary witness), who guides you! Please use the regular - legal - way and visit Teufelsberg on Saturday or Sundays 1 p.m. - For students or unemployed people it "only" costs 8 € - it is for a thing, what I considers a good cause."

(In response to the original comment left by the poster above.)

As I wrote in response to your previous comment:
I'd have a lot more compassion for protecting the heritage of Teufelsberg if there weren't hired goons threatening and assaulting people on the site.
Whether they work for Berlin Sight Out or merely themselves is almost irrelevant. Nobody should physically or mentally abuse anyone, in any circumstances.
As you can see from all the comments above, I'm not the first person to run into problems. I'm sure I won't be the last. Just because the guy running the operation has permission from the owner to run tours does not make it OK to bully and harass people, even if you think it's merely being "kind of awkward with you."
You talk about protecting the heritage. What's to protect? The place is fucked. It was fucked when I was there in 2009 for the first time.
I have a new update that I'll be posting now. It fills in a few blanks in the story.
Thanks for taking the time to write.
IB

the hill.bloody cold in winter working in a tin shack.jonnsey the driver taken us up for the night shift wrapped up in in great coats sitting in front of radios and tape recorders. getting calls for exercise rocking horse in the early hours and humping up to the hill just to sit there wondering.jack blacklock wo. done a spell as armed courier down to berlin hq, nearly shot jim wooton when showing what i had to do if challenged. i had a browning 9 mm, whistle, case and hadcuffs and that was that. anyone reading this remembers 18 gds tank div 208 motorised regr 3 shock army will know.the best was if you got in the american canteen first you had the pick of the menu. jim hammond was quized by the american cook for putting salad cream on his pears(he thought it was cream) happy days.ex op 562

Sounds like you have some fond memories of that place! I'd love to hear more of them. Can you email me? You'll get my email address through my profile above, or by clicking here: http://www.blogger.com/profile/15582705259374923073
Hope to hear from you ex op 562!

Greetings --

I spent some time in Berlin before and after Stackpole -- the blue building with the tower and the 2 domes. I was in both USM620K and USM5. I spent time discovering tunnels from the Hauptkadetten Anstalt (Andrews Barracks) to Templehof and the tunnels under Templehof -- there is as much below ground as above ground. I also found some of the Funkstelle the Wehrmacht used at Teufelsberg. The US, the Germans, and the Brits just covered it up and built on top of it. There was a tunnel from Marienfelde site to the east but this was discovered and closed.
I sat pos, transcribed, and hate reel to reel to this day.
Spoke with tower guards.
Have my own chunk of The Wall taken between Reichstag and Brandenburger Tor/Pariser Platz when it was, 'The Wall'.
Had a special tour of Spandau and saw the special resident.
Stole an East German flag from a unit in Magdeburg.
Had a great time.
Love Berlin.
Want to go back one day.

Hey there! Thanks for sharing your experiences! I'd love to hear more, so If you could email me directly I'd much appreciate it. You'll get the email link by clicking on my profile page.
Vielen Dank
IB

I worked there from 1990 to closure, then finished my tour working from Gatow.
Loved the place. It's a bit sad to see the place looking like it does, but i would actually love to return and have a look again.

You know there's a reunion later this year? In September. I'd love to hear more about your experiences. If you see this, please get in touch. You'll get my email address through my profile above.

No I didn't know. Thanks, I may look into that

i clicked email but not bringing anything up mate

The address is faheyc (at) gmail.com
Without spaces, without brackets and with the at sign where I've written at. Hope that works!

Hello. Having read these comments quite a few times before I finally got around to going today, I thought I'd add my thoughts and try to give an honest opinion because what I experienced was quite different to what I expected.

First of all, I was planning on going through the fence, not paying some dodgy people for a tour. Well after walking the wrong way for about 20 minutes (don't follow Google Maps on your phone if you've searched for Teufelsberg) I finally got up there. Just as I got there I saw a group of about 6 people being let in. In an instant I decided it wasn't worth trying to get through the fence because a) the guy had seen me walk up the hill and b) I wanted to take pictures and I didn't want to get found and kicked out after 2 minutes after having come so far. So, I coughed up 7 Euros and joined the tour ("tour"). Once I was in I was very satisfied with my decision because I saw a lot of people and several "tour guides", one of whom was American and was actually talking like a real tour guide (from what I gathered from a girl later on though, his cost 15 euros and was a bit longer).

I trailed the group taking pictures until the point where I lost them accidentally. Later I'd discover they went up to the domes and not down which is where I went. After that I wandered around on my own taking pictures "off the tour trail" and didn't see anyone else, which was pretty great. Eventually I gave up and started walking back. One of the guys saw me and was suspicious I hadn't paid and took me back to the gate, I asked if I could go up the tower and he said the tour was over. The next bit is what surprised me. The guy at the gate said I was in his tour and told the other guy to take me up to the tower with a couple of people who were waiting for the tour (so I basically got 2 tours in the end and didn't miss anything). I was genuinely surprised by this given that I expected these guys to be dodgy thugs. To be completely honest they were actually pretty nice and decent (I'm not saying they have always been like this of course).

Overall it is a shame not to be able to explore the place like you used to, but to me it was still definitely worth paying 7 euros because I had a great experience (on my own most of the time) and got some nice pictures. It seems that what once was a thuggish operation is now a pretty well-established tour thing, they even have books on Teufelsberg for sale at the gate. Oh and on another note, on my way back from the second time around a load of people got caught going through the hole in the fence. It's still there, around to the left of the gate. If you get there at a time when they are not (I was hoping it would be empty on Sunday but apparently not), then you could still get in.

Just thought I'd share my experience. I'm not excusing them for past behaviour but it seems like they've cleaned up their act a bit. If you want to just wak around and take photos, you can either chance it or pay 7 Euros. If you want what sounded like an actual tour (with the American guy) it's a whopping 15 Euros. Hope this information helps some people, as all of the comments here helped me.

-James

James, thank you very much for your comment. I'm glad someone had a positive story to share after all the negative stories I've heard and the bad experience I've had. Thanks for taking the time to share.
IB

Yeh, they are probably still jerks to anyone trying to get through the fence to be honest. My advice would be if you choose not to sneak in, then on the way back down from the tower at the end of the tour, when you take a left to go outside and back down, to take a sharp right and go down the next flight of stairs. A torch would be very useful though because some parts down there are pitch black (I used my phone). Then once you're finished exploring this bit (where there are literally no people, tourists or "tour guides", you can head around the building to the start and just claim you got lost.

-James

What's the situation at the moment? I'll be in Berlin 1st of februari (friday) until tuesday the 5th, and would love to visit this place. Thanks!

- Jasper

Hi Jasper. The situation hasn't changed much since I last updated this post. There is security on the site most of the time, if not all of it. The crowd they work for offer "official" tours on Sundays, and "unofficial" tours on other days, which may or may not actually involve them guiding you on a tour. The "official" tour is €15 as far as I know. If you google Teufelsberg tours I'm sure you'll find them. And if you hop the fence, they'll probably find you.
Viel Spaß!

Hey Irish. Can I tell you... I love your blogs! My friend and I are great fans of photography, and we googled exciting places in Berlin to go to - first hit, your blogs. :)
We went to the Spreepark on a very foggy night in November, and I can't but be honest, it was the craziest experience I've ever had. Edging along the fence, solely to discover a weak spot in the fence, was half an adventure. It was rather cold that night, and everything stood in deep mist. It was beautiful: the lighting in the sunset, before it got dark ;)

I've actually known the Teufelsberg since long, but I never gotten to actually going there, or even bothering to think about it. However, lately in these dark and cold wintery months, did I get excited about spring. I'm curious if it's possible to create a timelapse from the Teufelsberg overnight? I passed the area last year with my bike on a short trip, and took notice of the security guards everyone is rantng about, heh ;p.
Do they 'ever' leave?. I'm sure, that if they do, they lock the main gate etc. Well, is there a way to get in via paying (as hopping the fence I believe puts you onto their hostile list ;) , and just... staying overnight? haha. Or do they patrol the area and kick you out once it gets dark? Oh and, do you "have" to join a tour? or can you just roam freely?

thanks a million =]

Hi Christian,
I'm not sure what hours the security guards keep. When I confronted them one of them told me he lived on the site, but the head of the company that employs them told me no one lives there. So someone's telling porkies.
I think they expect you to stick to the tour, no wandering off freely, but others have done just that and lived to tell the tale. I didn't take a tour, so cannot really answer your question.
Best to just go up there and have a look for yourself. Let us know how you get on!
Good luck,
IB

why do you write abandoned??? it s not abandoned.. it has been bought by someone in 2010 maybe..is full of security...

Read the history man. It was abandoned before someone decided to make money out of it.

Well, I went there a couple of days ago as it was a beautiful day but unlike other times, the fences had been 'fixed' and I went round to try and find a gap, but didn't find any. I had no tools so didn't even try to climb the fence.
The last time I went was in June 2012, the fence was full of holes and access was easy. I didn't see any guards, dogs but quite a few visitors. Obviously, there not much left there, the buildings have been vandalised but I went up the tower and it's actually a little scary. The elevator shaft is open, and a fall would be nasty. As you go up the stairs, the wind gets stronger, there are no protection rails but the views are amazing.
Artists (well, guys who make graffiti) have had a hell of a time there. Paintings everywhere!

Here's my take on the place: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fred1969/sets/72157630436086072/

I can verify that were were indeed "Wildscheine" Wild pigs in Gruenewald. I drove to Andrews barracks from "the Hill" one day in 1969 and they hit my Ford 12M and ran off before I knew it. Those were the days.

Der Olle Ami

G'day
I just posted on the Vogelsang page. In fact I would be willing to adventure with you if you'll have me. I'm not scared of anything and physically fit.
These places are magic

G'day Cassie. There will be no lack of people willing to go on adventures with you once you get there.

And you're right - these places are magic.

I went to Teufelsberg a few times before, first some years ago when everything was pretty much open to everyone, then last summer and it was as you described (some weird-looking guards asking 5euros and a signature, then letting me wander freely). I always had plenty of fun and made a lot of good photographs there...
However, during a bike tour around Grünewald last month, I had a quick look at the place again: indeed, there seems to be only guided tours now, with 2 possibilities: 7euros/1h and 15euros/2h, without being able to be on my own (I came on a Sunday though, no idea about these unofficial tours on weekdays)
I had a quick chat with the guards (not the same guys as last summer): they didn't go into details, but they seemed to be dismissive about the previous guys, it actually seems to be a new company now. Maybe your posts & inquiries from last November made that happen?

-French Berliner

Hey French Berliner!
No, they fit the description of the guys I met in November. It's an official company as such, with permission from the owner to be on the site as long as they take care of "security". He doesn't care what money they make from tours, so they treat it as a cash cow and are milking it now while they still can.

Hi Irish Berliner !

First I would like to thank you for your blog ! Really hepful when you want to do cool stuff in Berlin.

I managed to get in Teufelberg, under the fences. After a couple of hours, we tried to climb the stairs to the tower ; one can find metal doors at each floor, some of them barbed. They were not closed, because there was some visits running. Arrived to the third floor, we faced a guard, who said us to go back. He seemed to call someone with his phone...
So we returned to our hole in the fence, which had already been repaired. The people who saw us cross probably referred to the staff of the place =/. We decided to "flee" by the main entrance, when we saw one (or more, according to my buddy, who had a better point of view) police car heading towards the main entrance. We were pretty stunned. However, we managed to cross over the fences without being caught, although I do not know whether the cops were here for us or not...

So saturday afternoon is, as one could easily guess, not the safest hour to get into the park. And the current guards might not be joking any more =/.

Actually I'm kind of glad they are there doing tours + security .Used to work for the British and saw TBerg from my flat each day .Spooky then . Went up there kite flying and walking the dog .Grünie Pigs do exist and a plenty .They keep a low profile during the day and are best avoided when they have little ones . Be careful on TBerg in June as there are tics .Some are nasty and infect your blood if you get bitten . As to the listening station and why I'm glad its being looked after --- there was a fire there couple or so years back . It destroyed many of the panels leaving the skeleton like TBerg we see today Approx 4 +years ago made a little film pre the fire , from outside the fence and the noise of the panels flapping was fantastic . Long live Teufelsberg ( which by the way has now been remeasured and is found to be larger than they thought ).... Check this out in the German press April 2013

Thanks for the comment Helena. Personally, I think they're just making money from admission fees, that the place is already thrashed to fuck and can't be any more thrashed, but there you go. If they are preserving it - and i think it should be preserved - then good.

Hi all,

I'm currently researching a longform article about Teufelsberg and I would love to hear some personal experiences of it. If you've been there, had contact with the people who have taken it over, or know anyone who worked there (or, of course, worked there yourself), then I'd love to hear from you.

You can reach me at HENRYKREMPELS AT GMAIL DOT COM

Thanks in advance.

I'm writing a piece on Teufelsberg for a literary magazine, and I'd love to include your experiences in it. If you're interested, you can reach me at henrykrempels(at)gmail.com

Hello
Just a quick update. I made it over to Teufelsberg yesterday (monday) with a couple of friends. We walked a little way along the fence, noting most of it had been shored up with metal, mesh, barbed wire, seemingly anything to hand. We had assumed it might be quiet on a monday, but arrived near the gate to find 7 or 8 folk who had already paid up to a frail looking fellow with a clipboard.
To be honest, having read through the comments on here (thanks btw! to you and all the submitters! very helpful), we had already decided if someone's on the gate, let's just pay, as it seemed most folk were caught at some point. Perhaps a little pessimistic... but hey, I just wanted to see it.
Anyway, 7€ and a waiver later, we were in. At first, it was a little annoying that the guy insisted we stay with him and the group, but you know, it's not a big site, yet there's enough space to explore without feeling as if you're in each other's pockets. They gave us plenty time to take photos (and i took tons), have a poke around and check out the amazing acoustics.
I wouldn't say everything felt super-organised, it was pretty lo-fi, but there was a presence that I think would be hard to avoid, there were atleast 3 guys on-site (one wearing a go-pro for some reason) and there were already more folk waiting to go in when we left (they locked the gate when we got in). So, pretty popular, even on a monday.
I'd recommend just sucking it up, try not to think about whether it's legit/fair and enjoy. It's an amazing place regardless of how you enter the premises. But that's just my humble of course, however you do it, just go, you won't regret it.
Nipper

Thanks for the up-to-date information on Teufelsberg - wanting the sun to come out so that I can eventually go!

There was a man dropping objects to a guy below from the opening in the today to. There seemed to be quite a lot of noise. Didn't approach the security as I wanted to keep low key

Explored the towers on May 30th. Such an incredible experience! Paid 7€ for entrance and "tour": It was TOTALLY worth it.

We saw a couple get escorted out for sneaking in without paying. Meanwhile we signed the waiver, saw a lot of incredible graffiti and entered the echo chamber at the top of the highest tower.

Check out this 360 Panorama of the inside of the echo chamber.
http://360.io/HNkdBh

My advice is to head over around mid-day and wait near the big green gate at the south west corner of the premises. It may be closed, but if you make some noise, someone will eventually come and let you in.
Google maps: 52.49620773579617,13.239237113915692

Enjoy...

sorry, I´m a little confused.. isn´t there any cance of getting in there without a guided tour? anybody any information about good times and places to sneak in?

Im going in an eveneing and im certainly not paying. Just did Spree park tonight and it was great. Send me a msg. minimalbeats at live dot co dot uk

ste c

Thanks for throwing in your tuppence ha'penny worth! Seems like sensible advice.

In other words, just give them their blood money...

They've made it hard to sneak in without paying, so if there's no other option, and you're still determined to see it, then paying may be your only hope.

I worked there in the early 80's as a linguist in the US Air Force. "I was an integral part of the US and worldwide communications network." That's my story, and I'm sticking to it... although I cannot confirm or deny that.

Just visited Monday and went round the whole perimeter trying to find somewhere to sneak in, but any previous holes have been patched up with barbed wire, more fencing etc. Tried pulling at the patching but to no avail. As we were wandering round, saw two guys inside and asked them about getting in. They told us about a tour and to carry on going to the gate, said they worked for the place by clearing up. (had wheelbarrows full of bottles/debris etc) They didn't look very official just a bunch of guys making a cheap buck.
When we got to the gate there was a painted sign, stating the place was patrolled by security, police would be called if you tried to sneak in. We tried to barter with the guy on the other side, asking for a quick 5minutes but told it was "unsafe" without guide.

Continued from above)
We decided to come back later and pay €7 with our tour guide" (a shirtless guy in shorts with no shoes who did answer questions)
The place was amazing and although couldn't explore the whole site went up the main tower and experienced the spectacular acoustics in the big dome. Whilst there didn't see any security as such and appears people are living there as we asked what a loud humming noise was, a generator, although he said that theoretically no one was living there.
It's a shame that it seems unlikely you can explore on your own but still an amazing experience and would definitely recommend it. From reading other comments on this blog, it seems that this a good money maker for those are occupying it and will probably remain difficult to sneak in.

Thanks for your comment. Yeah, I wrote about the goons now charging money to get in and see the place in two other separate posts. You're right - it's a good money-maker for those occupying it

Somebody apparently rents it from the developer who wanted to build luxury apartments. There are guys who wander around the perimeter all day so even if you bring your own cutters and cut the fence, odds are they will fix it and notify security before you have a chance to leave. If you want to tag some walls there you can send them an email and you can go in for free to add your art to the wall.
A lot of the holes in the floor in the main building has been fixed, debris swept out and lights added. It feels a lot different now and a little more safe than it did before any work had been done - basically it loses its creepiness factor which is partly why you go to abandoned places.
The tower is still really cool and while I don't like paying, I would still recommend trying to check it out.

Cheers Andrew. I wrote about the people renting it from the owner in another post. I agree - it's not as good with the goons around, but probably still work checking out if you haven't been before.

Actually the demand to visit the station is so high they now offer guided tours.

i was there last october i visited some friends that live there and took us there, the place is great its nice to see a place like that out of the ordinary in Berlin, but to get in we had to pay some Gipsies to let us in, i think they charged us 5 euros per person, they didn't let us walk around alone, this tall muscular guy escorted us throughout the place he look very scary and serious but he was nice he told us about the graffiti and what the place was used for, it was a great experience!!

Yes - as I've written in the post above and separately in two other posts.

Cheers Raul. Glad you enjoyed it despite the money-makers and visitor-shakers.

The new elevation measurement for Teufelsberg from April 2013, taken with GPS technology, is 120.1 meters.

Construction of the first permanent SIGINT facility on Teufelsberg, the operational home of Field Station Berlin, began in October 1963. The fiftieth anniversary of the shift from mobile to fixed operations on Teufelsberg, is being marked by a special Commemorative issue of Cinderella Stamps. The designer is T.H.E. Hill, the award winning author of two novels about Field Station Berlin.

The first day of issue of the Cinderella Stamps is 25 September 2013. The stamps will be presented during the Field Station Berlin Veterans' Reunion in Berlin, as a part of Irish sculptor Brendan Jamison's "Teufelsberg" show in Berlin's WerkStadt Gallery (Neukölln), 5-28 September 2013. The unveiling of the stamps will take place at WerkStadt on Wednesday September 25 at 2pm (14:00). This is a free event that everyone is welcome to attend.

The anniversary is also being marked by the presentation of a memorial plaque to Dipl.-Ing. Hartmut Gruhl of Gruhl & Partner Architekten, the owners of Teufelsberg, with duplicates for Berlin's Allied Museum and for display in Jamison's exhibition.

*****

You can learn more about the Commemorative Stamps at:
http://voicesunderberlin.com/Stamps5.html

You can learn more about Brendan Jamison’s exhibit at:
http://www.brendanjamison.com/teufelsberghome.html

You can learn more about the Field Station Berlin Commemorative Plaque project at:
http://voicesunderberlin.com/FSB_Plaque.html

You can learn more about Hill's Tberg novels at:
http://voicesunderberlin.com/

I'm in Berlin at the moment. Really fancy a visit to Teufelsberg but I don't want to spend my limited time in Berlin going there to find the place closed and unable to have a look around. Anyone knows if they are only letting people in at specific times/days and if so, when is that?

They have tours at weekends. If you go during the week the thugs will demand €8 for a "tour" but you won't get as much historical information as you would on a real one, which would cost €15.

I have just been on the tour today with my husband and friends it cost us £15 . It started at 1pm Sunday and finished at nearly 3pm but we were all very pleased to have done it .

Fair enough! Glad you enjoyed it. Thanks for letting us know about your experience.

http://andrejrusskovskij.com/?p=439
analog pics taken @ teufelsberg in January 2013

Nice pics man. You're building up quite a little series!

Thank you very much for twittering the link, I really do appreciate it!

Hi
Well this is an interesting read.
I worked at T’berg in the last 1980’s. Lots of memories.
There were Grunnie Pigs. One wrote a friend’s car off one night on the Strasse.
One had piglets right next to the main gate, the Americans provided straw bales to protect them, or protect us from the mother!!
The Facility the American eatery was a novelty. Some strange combinations. Root beer!
Wish I had gone there when I was back in Berlin in August last year. One the list to visit next time.
JANE

Hi,
I'll be in Berlin in September and this time I'd love to visit Teufelsberg. A guided tour would be ok, even the "officila" ones.
Does anybody have a link to who's running these tours?
Guido

Just Google it, man. Or look at the other Teufelsberg posts. I'm not going to give them any further publicity here.

Hey Jane,
I'd love to hear more from you if you'd be interested in sharing your stories. Please get in touch!
IB

So! We made our way to the top, quite surprised by the security hanging round the main entrance. Weve been discussing the entrance fee and so on...its all weird, these guis look like full-time junkies, guy who was guiding us was kind of shaking and during all the "guide" he said about 20 words in total. Guys occupying the main entrance are claiming theyre actually appointed by the company that owns the place, pointing at wasted board, where im supposed to find names of 2 architects, who own the place, and that 30% of the money goes to the investors, who own the place, who want to build there some luxury appartments (probably these two architects)really, in my opinion its just bunch of local smackheads seizing the opportunity. Such space should be freely accesible at your own risk. Really, instead of money, i recommend you to bring your fellas and knifes and guns and take over the place. Guys there, growing moss in between their teeth and shaking for another hit wont resist for too long i guess.

If you liked the first series, this one is even better :) More analogue pics taken at Teufelsberg during last summer http://andrejrusskovskij.com/?p=591

so, you tourists, you like to come to berlin and see those "special places", but dont want to pay anything...
yeah, thats totally berlin-tourist-style. come here, leave your dirt, be fancy, hate the locals, try to sneak in where its forbidden, take the stuff from abandoned places as a souvenir, complain about not englishspeaking (or whatever shitty language you speak) guards...well done! this is why berlin is going to be more and more ugly for the locals. you destroy what you want to experience.
do you think they have guards for the handfull of berliners, who go there once in their lives? or maybe because a shitload of tourists come here every single day and dont want to pay a fucking buck and leave there marks (johnny was here) and steal things?

think about.

Yes, the tourists are everything wrong with this beautiful city. If only there were no tourists, what a wonderful place it would be! No more stealing (because only tourists steal, right? They don't contribute anything at all), no more complaining (because Berliners never complain about anything), no more vandalism (because only tourists destroy what they see) and no more hate for the locals (oh how they despite the locals!) when all the locals offer in return is love and affection...
You sir/madam, are an idiot.
Think about.

Umm..we too have Grunie Pigs. Fed many of them as a kid.

I was at teufelsberg 19 72-1975 German and Russian lingie it was high adventure to me. I feel like Berlin is my hometown met so many nice german people
is my home town. I met so many nice German people

Went here last summer, yes, there are people charging an entrance fee at the door, but its totally worth it! Take the fun out of 'sneaking in', but its a beautiful site so we didn't mind.
Here are a few photos I took:
http://www.amazingplacesonearth.com/teufelsburg-germany/

I suppose you could sneak in at night, but it'd be more difficult to see the beautiful grafitti murals etc. and take photos, if youre into that.

I suggest going into the dome at the very top and scream as loud as you can, it echos like mad!

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